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Chrissy Lau inspired coat hangers

“The measure of intelligence is the ability to change.” Albert Einstein

Well Chrissy Lau is one clever clogs. Leaving England for sunny Sydney, this lady has a law degree and is a self-taught artist. This is a mural she created around the theme of change.

chrissyl_rocketmanmural07_irb

 Her illustrations are intricate and pretty.

chrissy lau collage

 I saw a few of these by Chrissy Lau at the local shops recently…

chrissy lau hangers x4

and thought to make something similar with water colour paints for our hangers at home!

5 in a rowii

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Ana Kraš inspired lampshade

This is Ana Kraš.

ana n monkey

She makes bonbon lanterns.

 bonbon

She lives in New York with Devendra Banhart. This is what she looks like threading a lantern.

ana making

My ‘creative space’ looks a little different to this. The floor is a mine field of hoola hoops. Daughter is learning how to hoop, ‘look at me mum, look at me!’ Son is elbow deep in mushed pear. The noodles are boiling over. Ah, the serenity.

I tried to make an Ana Kraš inspired lampshade. It all started well. First wool..

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then twine..

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more wool..

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This is when I became impatient and started using ribbon..

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more ribbon..

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then fabric. oh dear.

end result3

This Pinterest analogy pretty much sums it up.

1 nailed it

Fortunately we’re going to see Devendra play tomorrow night. This should cheer me up a bit!

1 on head

 


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The Incredible Book Eating Boy at The Sydney Opera House

The first time son was weighed by the local district nurse, she exclaimed, “Dear Lord, he eats like a Roman! If he keeps this up, you’ll have to install a vomitorium!” She chuckled heartily, so clearly this was a good gag.

Yesterday I smiled to myself when we went to see ‘The Incredible Book Eating Boy,’ as it reminded me so of that joke that was lost on me (though I did appreciate the nurses broad accent and thick rolling rrrr’s.) The tale is about a boy who eats a page… then a book… then books. Though of zero nutritional value, this is outweighed by the added bonus that with each book consumed he grows smarter and smarter (he would definitely get the joke about the vomitorium.)

how it works

His habit spirals out of control until his innards can take no more. Boy has to either a) install a vomitorium, or b) find another way to consume books. Fortunately he chooses the later and finds that he loves to read books too.

Although I found the book a little predictable (though clearly I’m not the bench mark to set these standard by), I was pleasantly surprised at how the theatre production brought this book to life for me …big time. There was song, there was dance and plenty of slapstick to keep me and 6 year old daughter similarly entertained. From go to woaw..  he’s throwing up bite size pieces of book, cascading like confetti! we were hooked.

dancing

I won a family pass courtesy of Arts Rocket (http://www.artsrocket.org/) a big thankyou!

book

The Incredible Book Eating Boy is playing at The Sydney Opera House from the 12- 27th April. So if you have kids (or adults) who’d be entertained by a book eating boy, do go! Daughter really enjoyed how this play opened, from the book that goes bad, to the opening of the visual domino effect.

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Ps Vomitorium: hailing from the latin vomitus (to vomit) and ancient times when vomiting was part of the fine dining experience to make way for more food.

 


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Easter Carrots

Be you naughty or be you nice, chances are come Easter Sunday you’ll be chowing down on chocolate. Easter is a good time for all!

Pay homage to that very busy Easter rabbit by kitting out your home with some lovely paper carrots…

how to make a paper carrot

Keep carrots on hand for sustenance…

carrot rabbit 4

read a carrot related book…  The Very Big Carrot by Satoe Tone.

satoe-tone-carrot-transport-kopie

..and have yourself a very merry Easter.

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Warrior

Ever since man has been able to lift a club, shoot an arrow, throw a spear or wield an axe, there have been shields.

African shields are oval in shape, made with buffalo hide stretched over a wooden frame and divided in two; one half indicating which tribe the warrior belongs to, and the other half his age. Once a young man has fought, pillaged and killed, distinctive marks are added to his shield by his fellow tribesmen. Painted on with charcoal, powdered soil, ground up bones and blood, circle and semi-circle shapes feature often in shield design as they represent bravery.

1925 postcard

I designed my shields first and researched their meaning later. If you wish to a) design your own shield with b) personalized meaning, see the chart below and choose wisely. With hens legs, wooden combs and Siamese crocodiles to choose from, I kind of wish I had!

making a cardboard shield

Cardboard, sharpie, stencil and paints.

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Tigers are a symbol of personal strength. Good choice!

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In the garden…

1 tigers in the garden

African Shield Symbols and their Meaning

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